Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Summary Response Outline Redo Act 2 Othello Kayla Lampe


Summary: No opinion- stick to the facts. No personal words (I, you, we, my, me, our, us, your)
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
Othello by William Shakespeare portrays how manipulative people can be. Iago finds weakness in people and uses this to manipulate them. Iago controls Roderigo when he convinces him he is able to persuade Desdemona to fall in love with him. In Act 2 of Shakespeare’s Othello, Iago uses people for his own benefit to help seek revenge against those people who have done him wrong.


Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
Act 2 of Othello, by Shakespeare, correctly  portrays how Iago manipulates his friends in order to get what he wants because he uses Roderigo’s love for Desdemona to get Roderigo to do things against his better nature.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
Ever since that night in Venice, Iago has controlled Roderigo through his dying love for Desdemona. Iago tells Roderigo that Desdemona is in love with Cassio, in order to destroy Cassio’s position as lieutenant, ”First, I must tell thee this: Desdemona is directly in love with him,” (Shakespeare 2.1.239-240).
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation”
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
Iago tricks Roderigo into thinking that Desdemona is in love with Cassio. Iago then convinces Roderigo to go after Cassio when he is drunk. Cassio is intoxicated, and when he is provoked by Roderigo, the two begin to fight. This escalates and Cassio almost kills a man. After this humiliation, Othello strips Cassio of his lieutenancy. Iago is manipulating all of these people with the words he speaks.


  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
when Iago offers ideas to Roderigo on how to win over Desdemona’s heart, he is simply giving helpful advice to a friend. It is not Iago’s choice on whether or not Roderigo follows through with the advice Iago gives him.  
    • After Iago tells Roderigo that Cassio and Desdemona are in love with each other he tries to convince him to provoke Cassio’s anger. Iago gives Roderigo the his advice, “Sir, he’s rash and very sudden in choler, and haply may strike at you. Provoke him that he may” (Shakespeare 2.1.294-295). Although Iago attempted to convince Roderigo to make Cassio angry, it was ultimately Roderigo’s choice whether or not to let his anger control his decisions. Iago did not force Roderigo physically to follow through with fighting Cassio. Iago is only giving Roderigo innocent advice and is in no blame for the fight between Roderigo and Cassio.
    • Evidence: Lead in,   “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?
Many think that Iago is not manipulating Roderigo, for Roderigo is doing all of his actions voluntarily.We cannot deny that Roderigo isn’t being forced by Iago to commit these actions. However, Iago is filling Roderigo’s mind with lies and deception. Even though it was Roderigo that fought Cassio, Iago planted an idea of hatred in Roderigo’s mind and Iago told Roderigo to fight Cassio. Iago also got Cassio drunk in order to destroy his sense of right and wrong. Roderigo is simply acting out of jealousy and hatred when he attacked Cassio. Those ideas were planted by Iago. Iago knows not to publicly show his despise for Othello and Cassio so he uses Roderigo as the front man to take all the hits. When Roderigo doubts one of Iago’s ideas, Iago simply tells him more lies to anger him. Roderigo attacked Cassio out of jealousy because he believes that Desdemona is in love with Cassio, an idea imbedded in his head by the one and only manipulative Iago.


  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
In Othello, written by Shakespeare, Iago uses people to get revenge upon Othello and Cassio, and manipulates them into believing lies, and allows them to take the fall for actions that are really Iago’s.



Sample  Outline for “ Cask of Amontillado”
Summary:
  • Topic sentence: Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” presents the power of revenge in ruling peoples’ choices and lives.
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas: From the simple beginnings of Fortunato dismissing Luchesi as a connoisseur of fine wine, to Montresor destroying the life of Fortunato for untold injuries, Poe demonstrates how revenge grips the lives of his characters.


Response:
  • Topic sentence:  In Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado”, Fortunato does not deserve to be the victim of Montresor’s wrath, because Montresor is deceitful through his words and actions.
  • Claim 1: Montresor’s words are laced with lies
    • Set-up From the beginning of the story, Montresor intentionally, misleadingly compliments Fortunato in order to convince him to go into the catacombs with him. His manipulation of words make it seem as though he is a friend to Fortunato, but ultimately, he lies to get him to do what he wants.
    • Evidence: Lead-in While he is leading him down the vault, Montresor insists that they turn back in order to falsely seem like he cares about his supposed friend,My friend, no. It is not the engagement, but the severe cold with which I perceive you are afflicted.  The vaults are insufferably damp. They are encrusted with nitre” ( Poe 1-2 ).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim  When Montresor says “my friend,”  the reader knows that he is blatantly lying because his intent is to bury him alive and the words he uses sound friendly and filled with worry and concern for his friend.
  • Counterclaim 1: However, .... Although the words Montresor uses seem to be lies, one might consider he is feeling guilty for his intended plan and is trying to back out.
    • Set-up As Montresor and Fortunato descend farther and farther into the catacombs, one might wonder if Montressor is trying to back out of his planned vengeance,
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “Come...we will go back; your health is precious. You are rich, respected, admired, beloved; you are as happy as once I was. You are a man to be missed. For me it is no matter. We will go back; you will be ill and I cannot be responsible” ( Poe 5 ).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim: Montressor is trying to give Fortunato the opportunity to escape his fate.  Montressor is realizing the weight of his words upon the future of Fortunato and trying to find a way to reverse the outcome when he speaks of not being responsible.
  • Claim 2: Montresor's actions are not to be trusted.
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? Rebuttal progression
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea



Summaries should include:
Only third person views
supporting ideas
~no quotes
facts; no opinions
strong verbs
attribute the ideas back to the author
explain ideas
concise
no plot
in your own words


Response:
Make an argument
take a position; correctly or incorrectly portrays


Proposal Paper
Rebuttal progression:


1st step: Describe a "naive response" or an opposing interpretation of your position. A "naive view" is a view that you personally disagree with or a view that misses something important. But don't use the word "naive." Say something like…
I used to think that...
A common view is that...
At first glance...
Many think that....
X argues that...
Critics of ____ propose…


Many think that Iago is not manipulating Roderigo, for Roderigo is doing all of his actions voluntarily.


2nd step: Briefly explain the logic or reasoning of this "naive view." Answer the question, "Why would someone think this way? Why would they find their answer or solution logical or reasonable?" Why did I think this way? Say something like...
We cannot deny that...
This way of making sense of the position makes a degree of sense [why?]
This position seems reasonable [why?]
I can understand why someone might interpret X in this way [explain how so]
These conclusions seem compelling [why?]


We cannot deny that Roderigo isn’t being forced, through words, by Iago to commit these actions.



3rd step: Provide a transition that indicates that you are going to contrast this "naive view." Say something like...
However...
But it's more complicated than that...
This interpretation is helpful, but it misses an important point...
This interpretation raises a fundamental question...
While this view seems plausible/reasonable at first glance, we should look closer…

However, Iago fills Roderigo’s mind with lies and deception. Even though it was Roderigo that fought Cassio, Iago planted an idea of hatred in Roderigo’s mind and Iago told Roderigo to fight Cassio. Iago also got Cassio drunk in order to destroy his sense of right and wrong. Roderigo is simply acting out of jealousy and hatred when he attacked Cassio. Those ideas were planted by Iago. Iago knows not to publicly show his despise for Othello and Cassio so he uses Roderigo as the front man to take all the hits. When Roderigo doubts one of Iago’s ideas, Iago simply tells him more lies to anger him. Roderigo attacked Cassio out of jealousy because he believes that Desdemona is in love with Cassio, an idea imbedded in his head by the one and only manipulative Roderigo. Iago’s manipulation is the root cause for all of the destruction taking place between Roderigo and Cassio.

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